Disclaimer

DISCLAIMER: Gallup Pakistan is not related to Gallup Inc. headquartered in Washington D.C. USA. We require that our surveys be credited fully as Gallup Pakistan (not Gallup or Gallup Poll). We disclaim any responsibility for surveys pertaining to Pakistani public opinion except those carried out by Gallup Pakistan, the Pakistani affiliate of Gallup International Association. For details on Gallup International Association see website: www.gallup-international.com

Search This Blog

Loading...

Friday, October 24, 2014

Electronic voting machines/Biometric system considered most effective for free and fair elections.

Islamabad, October 24, 2014

According to a Gilani Research Foundation Survey carried out by Gallup Pakistan, 52% Pakistanis think that electronic voting machines/biometric system can be most effective for free and fair elections; only 6% think that local elections or laws to improve the system can be effective. 

A nationally representative sample of adult men and women, from across the four provinces was asked, “Regarding the following electoral reforms, please tell us which kind of electoral reform can be most effective for free and fair elections in Pakistan?” In response to this question, 52% Pakistanis answered that introduction of electronic voting machines/biometric system can be most effective for free and fair elections, 24% said that giving more authority to Election Commission can be most effective, and 11% said that permanent hiring of staff to check the electoral system of Election Commission can be most effective. 6% respondents think that laws to improve the system of funding and expenses can be effective, while 6% believe in the effectiveness of local elections and 1% did not respond. 

Question: “Regarding the following electoral reforms, please tell us which kind of electoral reform can be most effective for free and fair elections in Pakistan?”


Source: GRF Poll (formerly known as Gilani Poll)
Field work conducted by Gallup Pakistan, the Pakistani affiliate of Gallup International Association



The study was released by Gilani Research Foundation and carried out by Gallup Pakistan, the Pakistani affiliate of Gallup International. The recent survey was carried out among a sample of 2514 men and women in rural and urban areas of all four provinces of the country, during October 06 – October 13, 2014. Error margin is estimated to be approximately ± 2-3 per cent at 95% confidence level.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Significant majority of internet users in Pakistan use handheld devices for internet access.

Islamabad, October 23, 2014

According to a Gilani Research Foundation Survey carried out by Gallup Pakistan, 76% internet users in Pakistan access the internet on cell phone, tablet, or other mobile handheld device; 21% do not.

A nationally representative sample of adult men and women who were internet users, from across the four provinces, was asked, “Do you access the internet on a cell phone, tablet, or other mobile handheld device?” In response to this question, 76% respondents said yes and 21% said no, while 3% respondents did not respond.
  
Question: “Do you access the internet on a cell phone, tablet, or other mobile handheld device?”

  
Source: GRF Poll (formerly known as Gilani Poll)
Field work conducted by Gallup Pakistan, the Pakistani affiliate of Gallup International Association


The study was released by Gilani Research Foundation and carried out by Gallup Pakistan, the Pakistani affiliate of Gallup International. The recent survey was carried out among a sample of 272 men and women in rural and urban areas of all four provinces of the country, during October 06 – October 13, 2014. Error margin is estimated to be approximately ± 2-3 per cent at 95% confidence level.

Overwhelming majority of Pakistanis do not use the internet.

Islamabad, October 22, 2014

According to a Gilani Research Foundation Survey carried out by Gallup Pakistan, 89% Pakistanis do not use the internet even occasionally; 11% use it.

A nationally representative sample of adult men and women, from across the four provinces was asked, “Do you use the internet, at least occasionally?” In response to this question, 11% respondents said they use the internet at least occasionally, while 89% respondents said they do not use the internet at all. 

Question: Do you use the internet, at least occasionally?” 
 

Source: GRF Poll (formerly known as Gilani Poll)
Field work conducted by Gallup Pakistan, the Pakistani affiliate of Gallup International Association



The study was released by Gilani Research Foundation and carried out by Gallup Pakistan, the Pakistani affiliate of Gallup International. The recent survey was carried out among a sample of 2514 men and women in rural and urban areas of all four provinces of the country, during October 06 – October 13, 2014. Error margin is estimated to be approximately ± 2-3 per cent at 95% confidence level.

Public opinion sharply divided over the amount of seats reserved for men and women in medical colleges.

Islamabad, October 21, 2014


According to a Gilani Research Foundation Survey carried out by Gallup Pakistan, 59% Pakistanis support more seats being reserved for men than for women in medical colleges; 40% oppose it.

A nationally representative sample of adult men and women, from across the four provinces was asked, “A large number of girls who study medicine do not continue their medical profession after getting married. Some people say that men should have more seats than women reserved for them in medical colleges to reduce this trend.  This will result in a lot of women getting deprived of admission in medical colleges. Do you support or oppose more seats being reserved for men than for women in medical colleges?” In response to this question, 59% respondents said they support more seats being reserved for men than for women in medical colleges, while 40% said they oppose it. 1% respondents did not respond.

Question: “A large number of girls who study medicine do not continue their medical profession after getting married. Some people say that men should have more seats than women reserved for them in medical colleges to reduce this trend.  This will result in a lot of women getting deprived of admission in medical colleges. Do you support or oppose more seats being reserved for men than for women in medical colleges?”



Source: GRF Poll (formerly known as Gilani Poll)
Field work conducted by Gallup Pakistan, the Pakistani affiliate of Gallup International Association




The study was released by Gilani Research Foundation and carried out by Gallup Pakistan, the Pakistani affiliate of Gallup International. The recent survey was carried out among a sample of 2514 men and women in rural and urban areas of all four provinces of the country, during October 06 – October 13, 2014. Error margin is estimated to be approximately ± 2-3 per cent at 95% confidence level.

Monday, October 20, 2014

Pakistan’s performance disappointing in areas of Civil Justice and Corruption.

Islamabad, October 20, 2014

According to the Rule of Law Index 2014 released by the World Justice Project, Pakistan ranks 91 in the area of absence of corruption and 94 for civil justice, among 99 countries. The WJP Rule of Law Index 2014 is the fourth report in an annual series. This year’s country scores and rankings include the latest data collected and processed by the WJP, based on more than 100,000 household and expert surveys in 99 countries and jurisdictions.

In the Rule of Law Index 2014, countries were given a score ranging from 0 to 1 for each factor, based on the survey results. For Civil Justice, Pakistan managed a score of 0.36 which is the second lowest among its regional peers in South Asia and is ranked at 94 globally. Afghanistan, which is the poorest performing country in Pakistan’s regional group, scored 0.27 with a global ranking of 99. Sri Lanka, which is the highest performing country in Pakistan’s regional group, scored 0.41 with a global ranking of 80.  

For Absence of Corruption, Pakistan managed a score of 0.29 which is again the second lowest among its regional peers in South Asia and is ranked at 91 globally. Afghanistan scored 0.24 with a global ranking of 99. Sri Lanka scored 0.53 with a global ranking of 39. Pakistan’s overall global ranking in the Rule of Law Index 2014 is 96.

Source: World Justice Report
Field work conducted by Gallup Pakistan, the Pakistani affiliate of Gallup International Association


The Rule of Law Index 2014 was released by the World Justice Project and the fieldwork for the survey in Pakistan was conducted by Gallup Pakistan.  The survey was carried out among a representative sample of 1000 respondents in the three largest cities of Pakistan: Karachi, Lahore and Faisalabad. This data was complemented by assessments from an average of 24 qualified respondents per country, which include professionals with expertise in civil and commercial law, criminal justice, labor law, and public health. The Rule of Law Index 2014 is a public document and is available on the website for the World Justice Project at: http://worldjusticeproject.org/rule-of-law-index.